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'm going to go to attain because cloud is often called technology. i've heard him call it a business model. he has written a very popular vote which compares all the different business models. tell us why you feel that way. >> actually, i'm going to make a comment before that. a lot of people discuss whether or not corporations are going to use the cloud. i actually did a thing -- i had to do a talk about a year-and-a- half ago to 40 of the largest company cio's on the planet. i said the list because i knew who was going to be in the room, to all of my buddies, and ask who of those were customers. so i abrogated all of the data. anybody want to guess? out of 40 of the largest companies in the world, how many of the were using one or more of these -- there was about seven different applications, all delivered out of clout, -- cloud. that's over. best guess, not over. 38 out of 40. of the largest companies in the world. using one or more of these. when we debate the question of will corporations use the cloud, i would say they already have. we clearly are still in the early adoption days. i
the university of central florida, and a degree in electrical engineering from the indian institute technology, bombay. he has authored numerous publications and has over 50 u.s. patents. >> thank you for organizing this panel discussion, and thank you, everybody, for graciously being here today. it is my great honor to introduce an incredibly distinguished panel of industrial luminaries. let me start with timothy, simon, and jeanette. tim is a professor at the stanford business school where he teaches a very popular class on this service via in fact, i have taken your class, and you bring in some incredible speakers and make it very entertaining. jim also has a distinguished career in the private sector. he was the president of oracle's on demand service, which by some records was the first online on demand service. cloud computing has a lot of fathers, but tim is often called the grandfather of cloud computing because of that endeavor. but tim is also an investor in a cloud computing companies, and author of some very exciting cloud computing books. thank you for being here. next, we have si
, right -- it is really can we use all this cloud technology to takeoff structures down and across this down so now, i can change and 8% spent on a bunch of stuff that other people can go due to 80% i get to build applications, which power a very different experience. you think about what the car of the future might look like, it is a computer with four wheels, right? that is what it is. what they start to do with it, etc., is completely different. i'm talking about what we all conceptualize as a manufacturer. when you ask the question what will happen in the future? it is harnessing this technology to really deliver a service economy, and the companies that do this, the guys that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program w
to it the families of sandy hook. that is why we are here today. i would like to thank lawn and all of our technology leaders for exporting one of our top, in fact, it is the city's major asset. our spirit of innovation. and launching into a national issue that demands immediate attention and it effects cities in every community across our nation. thank you for joining us this morning for this announcement, and i would at this time like to introduce the founder of the sandy hook promise, mr. tim macrus. >> good morning, my name is... we had a little bit of a logistical change and my name is lee show and i am the co-founder of the sandy hook promise and a member of the executive committee and thank you mayor lee for taking the time out of your busy schedule to join us. and the mayor knows the primary responsible of the government is to keep the citizens safe and thank you all for being here. i would like to start with a little background on sandy hook, promise and who we are and what we are determined to do and why we are here today. to understand the devastation of december 14th, the shootings and or
with a fresh view, with no assumptions. we need to create technology that allows us to visualize and measure brain functions in an affordable, accurate, and an accessible manner. in our scientific careers we have seen over and over again, seemingly impossible puzzles solved by young, fresh, thinkers. they don't know the rules. they don't live in a box of assumptions. and therefore, they are free to imagine. and that is why we are so thankful for jim and ron and the sandy hook promise. and owe them a great debt of gratitude because this is what they are asking for. they are asking for people to imagine. first, imagine what it is like to lose a loved one at the hands of a deranged gunman and let that motivate you to do something. imagine that we can identify people at risk of violent behave ors early in their life and intervene, imagine the communitis that support one another. embrace diversety and recognize the value of brain health and then let's go to work. let's create technology that allows us to visualize, and measure brain functions in an affordable, accurate and accessible manner so we
challenges and in san francisco we did just that. in fact, when we signaled from our technology company that is they were telling us that our payroll tax was a job-killing effort here that we had to change it. what we went ahead and fixed and it and got it done and after the dishandling of the redevelopment towards find a lasting solution to fund affordable house and is did that with the creation of affordable housing fund 30 million-dollar a year for the next 30 years to build affordable housings and to insentive eyes builders to get more housing on their sites and and invite police and firefighters into an emergency responders commute in san francisco to hmm with the down payments of the first too time home buyers efforts we were asked to vest? our neighborhood park and is streets and we did just that with our million dollar general obligation bond to build and construct more open space most importantly, we put san franciscans back to work and we have a growing economy and we have invested in our city. so the year of 20 if we will, was about getting everything done. and when we d
, technology, or whether it's tourism, and all the other great things that are happening in our city. and in fact we invested in 2012 in kid s f a special program we got funding from from the government federal department. labor to create the technology training center tech s f to reach out to disadvantaged kids in our city and make sure that they are getting the skill sets and the support that they need to so they can get in and really help us get rid of this digital guide that we suffer from and continue to suffer from in many of our communities and so transit center district plan, it's approved in september, if you see the cranes going up - you will know and you should realize that this center will represent 27,000 jobs just in that corridor. four -- of thousand new homes will be built as a result of that center and one thousand new hotel roonrooms and dwell acres of new open space and you are going to ask me where is that open space going to come from? imagine this it will be open space that is above the current surface ground, new spaces with the connection of all the to
. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with our tenants. it
. and you can look for us to be a technology hub going forward and we have never been followers. and have always been leaders. it's a very unique place and a great place to live. i relax by driving through and gatherings and reliving great memorize of being a kid in oakland and then i may end up just parking around little grand lake theatre and drive down and take a look at the paramount and so if there is a play that is happening and so the first thing that i tell people is go to jack land square and you will be surprised that we have a square and so shore line and it is the it could be the giving of great say food and go see things that inspire me about oakland is again it's ability to change. for every think that you would every say negative about oakland, i can say ten positives we are our own city. oakland to know it, is to love it.. >> (applause) all right. so thank you mayor khan and now we have for san francisco coming up and to sso to welcome mayor lee welcome kristine row wish senator vice senior vice president of service area of case zero permanenta. >> thank you peculiar
relax absorb the culture and create. and you can look for us to be a technology hub going forward and we have never been followers. and have always been leaders. it's a very unique place and a great place to live. i relax by driving through and gatherings and reliving great memorize of being a kid in oakland and then i may end up just parking around little grand lake theatre and drive down and take a look at the paramount and so if there is a play that is happening and so the first thing that i tell people is go to jack land square and you will be surprised that we have a square and so shore line and it is the it could be the giving of great say food and go see things that inspire me about oakland is again it's ability to change. for every think that you would every say negative about oakland, i can say ten positives we are our own city. oakland to know it, is to love it.. >> (applause) all right. so thank you mayor khan and now we have for san francisco coming up and to sso to welcome mayor lee welcome kristine row wish senator vice senior vice president of service area of c
will join force with you >>> well if you have an interest in technology you are going to find more kindred spirit in the san francisco area than you will find anywhere else. you are also going to find an interesting opportunities in the most interesting innovative companies, on the earth. >> the talent that i can attract is the #1 determinant of whether we are success of or not and how successful we become and if i could attract the bets and brightest, then i would be at a competitive disadvantage. >> all the thing you you need for a great company are in san francisco. san francisco for court instructs the jury technology is a one-stop shop. >>> the other thing that becomes very special is [inaudible] there is nowhere else go from here. . (applause) let me conclude with a little bit of sports and that is to say that, we are just about in spring training, world champions san francisco. also we are putting a bid together for super bowl 50, or 51 whichever one they will take, i'm be happy with that, yes, you know, we have got world baseball series coming in in march, in the at&t p
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
and for this center to be refurbished, technology wise, space wise and adding things like made in san francisco. i have to say that because for me i got to talk about san francisco in ireland, in paris, i'm going to talk about it beginning tomorrow night the day after when i arrive in beijing that we are really on our way to kind of manufacturing beautiful wonderful things that people can take with them that they are looking for all the time. i got those inquiries. what are you making in san francisco, the middle class in china, they have money to spend, they are investing all over the world. i want them to invest here along with the other 400,000 visitors that come through here and take the advantage of the exposure and what everybody associated with the movement here. we can have more of the products, more of the accessories, more of the things that they want to have as memories, but also make on going connections with us. i want to thank all the volunteers that are working here because, you know, you do it for the love of the city. if the visitors who speak multiple different languages walk in
to be with the talented and with oakland being the liberator and home of the -- technology in general and thriving arts and cutting edge innovation in general in areas we really have the talent here in the bay area and i think that is critical and also, i think we are looking at investors internationally and frankly at an -- promising a lot of our time to chinese investors and really an international economy but we are looking at not just across the country but to invest and -- in the bay area and it's not goal of -- 50% there and to ed we are a region and many of these companys are going to be make this horizontal and vertical -- chinese investors in the entire bay area and so they have to have it's a different game. and you know, texans have to live there. the reality is that this is one of the most beautiful places with the best whrr and -- [inaudible] company that is going to for tech assistance on your software and you get somebody in india well they are actually -- because oakland they are putting a call center in oakland to get a quicker turn around and -- in many languages and that is an inno
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we're not quite there yet, but it is close. the films can
for weddings and other events ar >> i am the chair of the club of science and technology member- led forum. i'm your chair for today. we also welcome our listening and viewing audience, and we invite everyone to visit us online. now, it is my pleasure to introduce our distinguished moderator who helped us all together today's panel. he is a technology veteran with operating in investing experience in technology businesses and the ceo of a premier north american publication with data center facilities, virtual private clouds, managed hosted platforms in san francisco, los angeles, and a nationwide high- performance backbone. it is also the managing partner of excellent capital, a private equity firm investing in growth stage companies. previously, was the co-founder of centera, the leading provider of wireless base stations. prior to that, he worked at national semiconductor, where he
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
,000 gallons a day. it is the beginning of understanding and feeling comfortable with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we
to get that great experience going and for this center to be refurbished, technology wise, space wise and adding things like made in san francisco. i have to say that because for me i got to talk about san francisco in ireland, in paris, i'm going to talk about it beginning tomorrow night the day after when i arrive in beijing that we are really on our way to kind of manufacturing beautiful wonderful things that people can take with them that they are looking for all the time. i got those inquiries. what are you making in san francisco, the middle class in china, they have money to spend, they are investing all over the world. i want them to invest here along with the other 400,000 visitors that come through here and take the advantage of the exposure and what everybody associated with the movement here. we can have more of the products, more of the accessories, more of the things that they want to have as memories, but also make on going connections with us. i want to thank all the volunteers that are working here because, you know, you do it for the love of the city. if the visitors
of understanding and feeling comfortable with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a bu
. the technology network in san jose who made this a crucial project. i want to call out a thanks to or tactical team. we know how to make it small, not over 150 feet in the air. we have a studio, zone engineering and i have to say thanks to hmr who has been a rock star and directly one of the reasons this is happening. an extremely talented project. thank you all. i also want to just take a moment to really acknowledge that while leo and i have done a lot of things m in this world, we would not be able to do it alone. there is only one person responsible for this project and that is executive director of the arts. luminarias. i can go on and on. i think i will throughout the night. do know that she's a special person and this entire community owes her a debt of gratitude. i want to thank leo and his family for bringing the level of artistic integrity for this work that somehow slipped through the progress of a work of contemporary art parallel in art history. it has everything to do with leo and our interpretations with our discussion and that one minute that transformed how people will be rec
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use the world cyber bullying. we talk about the behavior and there is tons of research we're doing in how people are behaving on our platform and the tools we can give them to resolve their issues and either through themselves and trusted audiences, et cetera, or turn to us and we don't use the term "cyber bullying" and we don't think about it's the technology. it's about the behavior itself and i know there is ongoing debate with that and cyber bullying captures people's attentions and everything i have learned from anne and the nonprofit community and the academic folks who have researched this when you use a term like "cyber bullying" you are diminishing the behavior and placing it on the technology. >> personally i hate it. it suggests robots and not humans at all. let's think about humanity, not technology. >> so i want to show you a couple of things and show you my version of a sizzle reel which is not sizzle and i am also mindful it's 4:00 o'clock on a friday so we are the last people between you and weekend, so let
i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but o
to be held hostage by a vendor or by technology. this data belongs to our constituents. we are simply stewards of it. in closing, i want to thank the hatchery, i want to thank our city leadership, mayor, as well as president chiu and partnering with us on this legislation. and i want to thank all of you in our community who have really done amazing things with this data. it's just a celebration of the good work that you're doing that we're here. open data would not exist without our community. so, with that, i'm going to actually hand it off to 100 plus to do a really quick demo and then we're going to do a little q & a and we'll have them come up next. >> 100 plus, we're based here in san francisco. we are interested in small healthy behaviors, ways to be healthy that don't involve going to the gym. we created a system where we recommend hops or help opportunities. these are little activities and places that are seed by users and served to other users based on location. and we used open data to seed our entire system. so, we input over a thousand things from open data including parks
. this is a critical tool as we use technology on the wastewater side of our system to move forward. >> all right. commissioner. >> i hate to sound skeptical. [speaker not understood] seems like this is something on the market. doesn't seem like such a hot ticket. i don't know. i sort of read into it, looked at it. it's not a huge contract amount, but it's still 160,000 and just really sort of a cutting edge of our technology and something being used pretty widely throughout the industry. if you can speak a little to that. >> so, actually, it's three different -- i do have stephanie hair aston here who is the program manager. ~ hair ston. this is in partnership with noaa and we want to be with them. one of the cities put this in place, austin being one. i don't know what the other cities are. if you want more detail, stephanie can maybe talk a little more about the technology. >> do these things really work? i guess that's my question. >> so, we're going to be working with a research consortium. it's a research test bed within noaa. and right now the national -- we get our forecast information fr
looked at zones and with new technology we can where a taxi is and license it to be in certain places. none of the neighborhoods outside the corridor are being serviced. we expect to lay the foundation for using modern technology so i knowed have options. and then my second question is back to the directors question is the increase of the madalinas. and this is on the budget impact of shifting the pricing of the madalinas. i was looking through my comprehensive budget and what will be the impact to the raw budget? >> up until this point we haven't, you know, decided how many of the madalinas would be when we set a price we didn't know maybe every 10 we use the impact would be this. the math is if we were to secure authorization to get 1 hundred would be times 3 hundred thousand or so. that's the budget impact our if you recall when we were developing the two year budget we're conservative we didn't know where this process was going to go. so the question is the recommendation from 2 to 3 hundred would it yeast a revenue problem? no, i think we have a low enough 0 number we won't crea
networking. she served on president obama technology working group and delivered its group to congress and youth safety on the internet and you can read her plug. how's that for a plug? >> thank you very much. our parents guide is free and can be distributed at schools or parent nights or whatever, so we're happy to make them available to you at connect safety .org so a little bit more of the big picture. this is amazing panel of people who have resources and campaigns that can support and reinforce your fine work. so i am glad you stayedand we learned about bullying and preventions and solutions and just to reinforce getting the accurate picture bullying is a serious problem but it's not an epidemic. it's not on the rise. daift finkelhorn and director of the research center university of new hampshire and reviewed studies and bullying among youth is actually down in recent years. his colleague have actually stopped using the term of "bullying" and refer to peer aggression and i can go into definitions but i won't bore you. a subset of bullying is also not on the rise and based
are announcing today with our technology community and certainly with the families of sandy hook. i would like to thank the families who flew all the way here from newtown, connecticut for joining us here today in san francisco. and while you are far away from home, i hope that you feel welcomed in our city. as a father of two girls myself, i can't imagine the pain and grief that you have suffered these past three months. and i have profound respect for your courage and for your commitment, for turning this grief into action. the tragic and horrifying events in sandy hook elementary school, touched every american, a tragedy of this magnitude brings along with it the pain, the shock, and the disbelief. and it forces all of us to ask the question how can we prevent such terrible events? how do we protect our children? our youth, our residents? for san francisco, it is very important for us to continue to have an open dialogue regarding gun violence so that we can answer these questions ourselves. today, we honored the three-month anniversary of the tragic mass shootings at sandy hook, elementary
a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before they escalate to a mo
it comes to technology. we have put in computers in 54 sites in the city. and we would like to have those sites maintained when you do your budget. we want to make sure that the money is there so they can continue to skype, tweet, have online banking, check their online medical records. and to keep in contact with all of their friends and families who are all across the world. so for the seniors and people with disabilities, we are hoping you will make that a special, special consideration when you do your budget. because the seniors are the foundation of any community. and we would like to make sure that they stay connected. we would like to thank ann henson, the leadership of the department of asian and adult services. we could not have done this without her support. thank you very much. >> good eveni ining everyone, a mayor and department heads. i am eddie part of the bayview program. i want to say that our program is the only program out here to service with youth dealing with multicultural youth programs. and we are fortunate to get support from the city and to be out here. and all d
innovation. we continuously seek out ways to leverage new technologies, reduce cost, find efficiencies, and create meaningful public/private order 68 in the cities unification efforts. the thing today, zero graffiti for a beautiful city is one whole world can embrace. i hope that you are inspired today and throughout the conference to exchange ideas and find solutions to improve the quality-of-life in your city. thank you for your dedication and commitment to eradicate graffiti vandalism. keep up the great work and enjoy our world-class city. (applause) >>: next, i'm mayor ed lee -- ( laughter) >>: alright, i'd like to introduce a champion of -- (indiscernible) to take advantage of san francisco's cutting edge -- to keep the city clean and green. we are delighted to have him here say a few words. (indiscernible) he also was one of our speakers that participated at the first conference of the graffiti advisory board in 2009. currently the president of the board of supervisors, and the supervisor for district 3. president david chiu. >> supervisor chiu: good morning. i am not ed lee. on
in technology and healthcare as well and case veer certainly helps our entire community thrive and then one s f which, is out of the organizing committee and one s f and i hope you take time to get very familiar with what this organization is doing for san francisco and how you can utilize this organization to become a part of the american's cup experience. one s f is mobilizing san francisco's corporation and is citizens behind the many many community and legacy benefits of the america's cup and there are many. cruise ship terminal infrastructure projects and so when you become a one s f partner you will drive that local effort and help provide the funding support and there are so many exciting ways you can become aligned with the cup this exciting year and so one s f of the america's cup organizing committee and really the mayor will say more about that and robert half international i have to thank them for helping me find my great business manager this year just on the side and i wanted to thank randal my second who's regent vice president of mice executive international and they help us
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations c
policy. one of the things interesting is at this convention we see new products and technologies being brought forward. in my 25 years as a building inspector this is the most interesting. where something has changed. this is fire-proof paint they're demonstrating here. the building at the end, and the building at this end were both filled with some material, wood and excelier and stuff to start a fire. they lit them at the same time. four or five minutes ago. the building on the end is painted with regular latex paint on everybody's house. the building next to that is painted with latex paint. >> that is catching fire now. >> we can simulate the fire spread from house to house. and we anticipate unfortunately again. the next 2 buildings are coated with the fireproof paint. many companies make this stuff. this is a particular brand made international fire resistance. >> they were generous to do the mock up for us. >> they have done this at the request of the building department. we have seen that the building at the end, just painted with latex paint is just about gone. the building
healthcare and certainly a leader in technology and healthcare as well and case veer certainly helps our entire community thrive and then one s f which, is out of the organizing committee and one s f and i hope you take time to get very familiar with what this organization is doing for san francisco and how you can utilize this organization to become a part of the american's cup experience. one s f is mobilizing san francisco's corporation and is citizens behind the many many community and legacy benefits of the america's cup and there are many. cruise ship terminal infrastructure projects and so when you become a one s f partner you will drive that local effort and help provide the funding support and there are so many exciting ways you can become aligned with the cup this exciting year and so one s f of the america's cup organizing committee and really the mayor will say more about that and robert half international i have to thank them for helping me find my great business manager this year just on the side and i wanted to thank randal my second who's regent vice president of mice
but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world with tools to live in the chewing print with 3-d or even topple dock - we're fashioned our food that bears the label of san francisco. a stamp yes. a stamp and mark of craft manship by consumers all around the world where we've got 26 cranes our own residents back on the work building san francisco with their skills and a whole lot of heart. and very soon a spectacular for a world-class concerts and event we've got a great stadium. our unemployment rate is down to 6.5 percent from 9.6 when i first took office that means thirty thousand more san franciscans back to work today. nearly 11 million square feet of office space was leased last year. we've got the first new commercial high-rise officials building breaking ground this spring were we passed the business tax reform and bonds to renew our parks and open spaces. for the first time we've got to balanced budget. our budget resources are growing. this summer we welcomed the first north cup r
, we'll invite all our heeds from regional transportation system and our technology community to the table. i'm also thankful that commissioner wen eras agreed to meet with us on this opportunity. we'll maintain the condition of our streets and we'll make municipal transportation systems in this city work the way they want to work. don't get close to our municipal syst system that some folks may say. we cannot let politics be our guide. paris london and england has great transportation systems but look at san francisco. achieving a world class transportation system is a journey forward not a december nation but let's approach our transportation challenges the san francisco way once again through consensus and common and let's us take up the hard work and take the first part of the journey now. an equal exchange is the availability of housing yes. in spite of all we're doing for every of every income especially low income families. i know smob about this topic i'll fought to get this under control from my long hair days. we cannot defy the cost of living in our town. we haven't
. the richter scale was early technology. >> probably a myth that i hear most often is my building is just fine in the loma prieta earthquake so everything is fine. is that true ? >> loma prieta was different. the ground acceleration here was quite moderate and the duration was moderate. so anyone that believes they survived a big earthquake and their building has been tested is sadly mistaken. >> we are planning for the bigger earthquake closer to san francisco and a fault totally independent. >> much stronger than the loma prieta earthquake. >> so people who were here in '89 they should say 3 times as strong and twice as long and that will give them more of an occasion of the earthquake we would have. 10 percent isn't really the threshold of damage. when you triple it you cross that line. it's much more damage in earthquake. >> i want to thank you, harvey, thanks pat for
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